Course Description

Computer Applications is a 36-week course with 10 units. Each unit takes approximately 3 weeks (15-18 hours) to complete. Students learn basic keyboarding skills, the basics of how to use a computer, word processing, spreadsheets, database management and desk top publishing programs using Microsoft Office.

Students also learn how to access the Internet for school and research purposes and to build their own simple web page using Microsoft Office and basic HTML. They learn how to use different search engines to locate information, how to use email, ftp (file-transfer-protocol), chat rooms and the different social aspects of the Internet. Students also learn about the origins and history of the Internet, how it is controlled and organized and what the future may hold for users of technology.

Course content is aligned with TEKS: Middle School Computer Applications, National Guidelines and ISTE recommendations and either meet or exceed those guidelines.

§126.12. Technology Applications (Computer Literacy), Grades 6-8.

(a) General requirements. Districts have the flexibility of offering technology applications (computer literacy) in a variety of settings, including a specific class or integrated into other subject areas.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) compare, contrast, and appropriately use the various input, processing, output, and primary/secondary storage devices;

(C) demonstrate the ability to select and use software for a defined task according to quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(D) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity;

(E) use technology terminology appropriate to the task;

(F) perform basic software application functions including, but not limited to, opening an application program and creating, modifying, printing, and saving documents;

(G) explain the differences between analog and digital technology systems and give examples of each;

(H) use terminology related to the Internet appropriately including, but not limited to, electronic mail (e-mail), Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), electronic bookmarks, local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), World Wide Web (WWW) page, and HyperText Markup Language (HTML); and

(I) compare and contrast LANs, WANs, Internet, and intranet.

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of input devices such as mouse/track pad, keyboard, microphone, digital camera, printer, scanner, disk/disc, modem, CD-ROM, or joystick;

(B) demonstrate keyboarding proficiency in technique and posture while building speed;

(C) use digital keyboarding standards for data input such as one space after punctuation, the use of em/en dashes, and smart quotation marks; and

(D) develop strategies for capturing digital files while conserving memory and retaining image quality.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use while in an individual classroom, lab, or on the Internet and intranet;

(C) describe the consequences regarding copyright violations including, but not limited to, computer hacking, computer piracy, intentional virus setting, and invasion of privacy;

(D) identify the impact of technology applications on society through research, interviews, and personal observation; and

(E) demonstrate knowledge of the relevancy of technology to future careers, life-long learning, and daily living for individuals of all ages.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use strategies to locate and acquire desired information on LANs and WANs, including the Internet, intranet, and collaborative software; and

(B) apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the acquisition of information including keyword and Boolean search strategies.

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) identify, create, and use files in various formats such as text, bitmapped/vector graphics, image, video, and audio files;

(B) demonstrate the ability to access, operate, and manipulate information from secondary storage and remote devices including CD-ROM/laser discs and on-line catalogs; and

(C) use on-line help and other documentation.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and employ methods to evaluate the electronic information for accuracy and validity;

(B) resolve information conflicts and validate information through accessing, researching, and comparing data; and

(C) demonstrate the ability to identify the source, location, media type, relevancy, and content validity of available information.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) plan, create, and edit documents created with a word processor using readable fonts, alignment, page setup, tabs, and ruler settings;

(B) create and edit spreadsheet documents using all data types, formulas and functions, and chart information;

(C) plan, create, and edit databases by defining fields, entering data, and designing layouts appropriate for reporting;

(D) demonstrate proficiency in the use of multimedia authoring programs by creating linear or non-linear projects incorporating text, audio, video, and graphics;

(E) create a document using desktop publishing techniques including, but not limited to, the creation of multi-column or multi-section documents with a variety of text-wrapped frame formats;

(F) differentiate between and demonstrate the appropriate use of a variety of graphic tools found in draw and paint applications;

(G) integrate two or more productivity tools into a document including, but not limited to, tables, charts and graphs, graphics from paint or draw programs, and mail merge;

(H) use interactive virtual environments, appropriate to level, such as virtual reality or simulations;

(I) use technical writing strategies to create products such as a technical instruction guide; and

(J) use foundation and enrichment curricula in the creation of products.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor;

(B) complete tasks using technological collaboration such as sharing information through on-line communications;

(C) use groupware, collaborative software, and productivity tools to create products;

(D) use technology in self-directed activities by sharing products for defined audiences; and

(E) integrate acquired technology applications skills, strategies, and use of the word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunications, draw, paint, and utility programs into the foundation and enrichment curricula.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product; and

(B) resolve information conflicts and validate information through research and comparison of data.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) use productivity tools to create effective document files for defined audiences such as slide shows, posters, multimedia presentations, newsletters, brochures, or reports;

(B) demonstrate the use of a variety of layouts in a database to communicate information appropriately including horizontal and vertical layouts;

(C) create a variety of spreadsheet layouts containing descriptive labels and page settings;

(D) demonstrate appropriate use of fonts, styles, and sizes, as well as effective use of graphics and page design to effectively communicate; and

(E) match the chart style to the data when creating and labeling charts.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video;

(B) design and create interdisciplinary multimedia presentations for defined audiences including audio, video, text, and graphics; and

(C) use telecommunication tools for publishing such as Internet browsers, video conferencing, or distance learning.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review and evaluate the product using technology tools such as database managers, daily/monthly planners, and project management tools;

(B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience, demonstrating that process and product can be evaluated using established criteria or rubrics;

(C) select representative products to be collected and stored in an electronic evaluation tool; and

(D) evaluate the product for relevance to the assignment or task.

 

Source: The provisions of this §126.12 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This introductory-level course presents the understanding of Java and how to build and compile a stand-alone application (working with real-world scenarios). This course is designed especially for students who have very little background, but have taken the Programming I: VB.NET course. This course concentrates on Java programming language, built-in data types, control structures, classes, objects, inheritance, and polymorphism. By the end of the course the student will be able to write basic programs using Java as well as basic applets using updated techniques. Students can pursue further instruction in Java programming and other programming languages.

Course content is aligned with TEKS:

§126.29. Independent Study in Technology Applications (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is completion of a high school technology applications course as identified in this subchapter and permission of the instructor/mentor for Independent Study in Technology Applications. This course may be taken at Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) make decisions regarding the selection, acquisition, and use of software taking under consideration its quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(C) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; and

(D) use appropriate technology terminology in the independent study course.

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of electronic input devices including the mouse, keyboard, scanner, voice/sound recorder, disk/disc, video, and digital camera as appropriate; and

(B) use digital keyboarding standards for data input such as one space after punctuation, the use of em/en dashes, and smart quotation marks.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and intranet; and

(C) model respect of intellectual property when manipulating, morphing, or editing graphics, video, text, and sound.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including the Internet and intranet, in research and resource sharing;

(B) apply appropriate search strategies in the acquisition of information from the Internet including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and

(C) pose hypotheses/questions related to a selected problem.

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) acquire information using appropriate research strategies and a variety of electronic formats, including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source; and

(B) identify, create, and use available file formats including text, image, video (analog and digital), and audio files.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and employ a method to evaluate the design, functionality, and accuracy of the accessed information; and

(B) analyze information for validity and relevance in the confirmation, testing, and solution of the hypotheses and questions.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) develop and apply advanced technology applications skills;

(B) identify and solve problems, individually and with input from peers and professionals, utilizing research methods and advanced technology applications skills used in a selected profession or discipline;

(C) select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunication, draw, paint, and utility programs into the creation of products;

(D) use foundation and enrichment curricular content in the creation of products;

(E) synthesize and generate new information from data gathered from electronic and telecommunications resources; and

(F) read and use technical documentation.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) work with a mentor to determine problem to be solved, hypotheses, and strategies to accomplish task;

(B) develop products that meet standards identified by the selected profession or discipline;

(C) produce original work to solve the identified problem and publish the product in electronic media and print;

(D) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor; and

(E) participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(B) produce documentation to illustrate the progress of the project including, but not limited to journals, logs, videos, pictorial documentation, multimedia products, and printed books; and

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in delineating technological tasks and problem solving.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) format the developed projects according to defined output specifications including target audience and viewing environment; and

(B) present findings to a panel for comment and professional response.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and implement the best method of presenting or publishing findings;

(B) synthesize and publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and

(C) use LANs, WANs, and remote resources to exchange and publish information.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review and evaluate the product using technology tools such as database managers, daily/monthly planners, and project management tools;

(B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience, demonstrating that process and product can be evaluated using established criteria or rubrics;

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in evaluating the product; and

(D) make necessary revisions and/or proceed to the next stage of study. 

Source: The provisions of this §126.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.


Course Description:

In Digital Photography, students will learn the basics of photographic composition and lighting, the basics of using a digital camera and the basics of preparing a digital darkroom. Students will also learn basic color theory and the fundamentals of image processing. This course is designed for the student who has no background in photography.

Course content is aligned with TEKS:

§126.29. Independent Study in Technology Applications (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is completion of a high school technology applications course as identified in this subchapter and permission of the instructor/mentor for Independent Study in Technology Applications. This course may be taken at Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) make decisions regarding the selection, acquisition, and use of software taking under consideration its quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(C) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; and

(D) use appropriate technology terminology in the independent study course.

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of electronic input devices including the mouse, keyboard, scanner, voice/sound recorder, disk/disc, video, and digital camera as appropriate; and

(B) use digital keyboarding standards for data input such as one space after punctuation, the use of em/en dashes, and smart quotation marks.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and intranet; and

(C) model respect of intellectual property when manipulating, morphing, or editing graphics, video, text, and sound.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including the Internet and intranet, in research and resource sharing;

(B) apply appropriate search strategies in the acquisition of information from the Internet including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and

(C) pose hypotheses/questions related to a selected problem.

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) acquire information using appropriate research strategies and a variety of electronic formats, including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source; and

(B) identify, create, and use available file formats including text, image, video (analog and digital), and audio files.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and employ a method to evaluate the design, functionality, and accuracy of the accessed information; and

(B) analyze information for validity and relevance in the confirmation, testing, and solution of the hypotheses and questions.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) develop and apply advanced technology applications skills;

(B) identify and solve problems, individually and with input from peers and professionals, utilizing research methods and advanced technology applications skills used in a selected profession or discipline;

(C) select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunication, draw, paint, and utility programs into the creation of products;

(D) use foundation and enrichment curricular content in the creation of products;

(E) synthesize and generate new information from data gathered from electronic and telecommunications resources; and

(F) read and use technical documentation.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) work with a mentor to determine problem to be solved, hypotheses, and strategies to accomplish task;

(B) develop products that meet standards identified by the selected profession or discipline;

(C) produce original work to solve the identified problem and publish the product in electronic media and print;

(D) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor; and

(E) participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(B) produce documentation to illustrate the progress of the project including, but not limited to journals, logs, videos, pictorial documentation, multimedia products, and printed books; and

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in delineating technological tasks and problem solving.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) format the developed projects according to defined output specifications including target audience and viewing environment; and

(B) present findings to a panel for comment and professional response.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and implement the best method of presenting or publishing findings;

(B) synthesize and publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and

(C) use LANs, WANs, and remote resources to exchange and publish information.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review and evaluate the product using technology tools such as database managers, daily/monthly planners, and project management tools;

(B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience, demonstrating that process and product can be evaluated using established criteria or rubrics;

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in evaluating the product; and

(D) make necessary revisions and/or proceed to the next stage of study. 

Source: The provisions of this §126.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course presents basic programming and teaches the essential concepts of VisualBasic.NET (VB.NET). As an introduction to VB.NET, students will see the basic uses of the programming language, its similarities to the English language (and others), and its flexibility as a programming language. The course helps participants understand the processes involved in software development and object-oriented programming. This is an introductory course that could lead to careers such as software engineer, developer, or game designer. The course participants will also complete a series of hands-on projects covering built in data types, operators, control structures, classes, and objects.

Course content is aligned with TEKS:

§126.29. Independent Study in Technology Applications (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is completion of a high school technology applications course as identified in this subchapter and permission of the instructor/mentor for Independent Study in Technology Applications. This course may be taken at Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) make decisions regarding the selection, acquisition, and use of software taking under consideration its quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(C) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; and

(D) use appropriate technology terminology in the independent study course.

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of electronic input devices including the mouse, keyboard, scanner, voice/sound recorder, disk/disc, video, and digital camera as appropriate; and

(B) use digital keyboarding standards for data input such as one space after punctuation, the use of em/en dashes, and smart quotation marks.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and intranet; and

(C) model respect of intellectual property when manipulating, morphing, or editing graphics, video, text, and sound.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including the Internet and intranet, in research and resource sharing;

(B) apply appropriate search strategies in the acquisition of information from the Internet including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and

(C) pose hypotheses/questions related to a selected problem.

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) acquire information using appropriate research strategies and a variety of electronic formats, including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source; and

(B) identify, create, and use available file formats including text, image, video (analog and digital), and audio files.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and employ a method to evaluate the design, functionality, and accuracy of the accessed information; and

(B) analyze information for validity and relevance in the confirmation, testing, and solution of the hypotheses and questions.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) develop and apply advanced technology applications skills;

(B) identify and solve problems, individually and with input from peers and professionals, utilizing research methods and advanced technology applications skills used in a selected profession or discipline;

(C) select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunication, draw, paint, and utility programs into the creation of products;

(D) use foundation and enrichment curricular content in the creation of products;

(E) synthesize and generate new information from data gathered from electronic and telecommunications resources; and

(F) read and use technical documentation.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) work with a mentor to determine problem to be solved, hypotheses, and strategies to accomplish task;

(B) develop products that meet standards identified by the selected profession or discipline;

(C) produce original work to solve the identified problem and publish the product in electronic media and print;

(D) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor; and

(E) participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(B) produce documentation to illustrate the progress of the project including, but not limited to journals, logs, videos, pictorial documentation, multimedia products, and printed books; and

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in delineating technological tasks and problem solving.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) format the developed projects according to defined output specifications including target audience and viewing environment; and

(B) present findings to a panel for comment and professional response.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and implement the best method of presenting or publishing findings;

(B) synthesize and publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and

(C) use LANs, WANs, and remote resources to exchange and publish information.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review and evaluate the product using technology tools such as database managers, daily/monthly planners, and project management tools;

(B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience, demonstrating that process and product can be evaluated using established criteria or rubrics;

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in evaluating the product; and

(D) make necessary revisions and/or proceed to the next stage of study. 

Source: The provisions of this §126.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this course you will be expected to master Web site creation essentials, learn different tools to create Web sites, and learn to make Web sites that follow copyright laws and American with Disabilities Act guidelines. Your progress will be monitored by an online instructor and you will communicate with your instructor via e-mail, Skype, and Jigsaw. 

Students also learn how to make their web pages look aesthetically pleasing in both Netscape and Internet Explorer, and to include elements that make them handicapped accessible.  

Course content is aligned with TEKS:

§126.28. Web Mastering (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is proficiency in the knowledge and skills described in §126.12(c) of this title (relating to Technology Applications (Computer Literacy), Grades 6-8). This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) compare, contrast, and use appropriately the various input, processing, output, and primary/secondary storage devices;

(C) make decisions regarding the selection, acquisition, and use of software taking under consideration its quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(D) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity;

(E) use vocabulary related to web mastering and delineate between the Internet and an intranet;

(F) summarize the technical needs of a World Wide Web (WWW) server including Random Access Memory (RAM), hard disk capacity, Central Processing Unit (CPU) speed, methods of connectivity, and appropriate software; and

(G) summarize the development of Internet protocols including, but not limited to, hypertext transfer protocol (http), gopher, file transfer protocol (ftp), telnet, and wide area information system (wais).

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) outline differences among a variety of electronic input devices; and

(B) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of electronic input devices such as keyboard, scanner, voice/sound recorder, mouse, touch screen or digital video by incorporating such components while publishing WWW pages.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and intranet; and

(C) analyze the impact of the WWW on society through research, interviews, and personal observation.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs) including the Internet and intranet in research and resource sharing;

(B) construct appropriate search strategies in the acquisition of information from the Internet including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and

(C) obtain Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) and distinguish among the protocols including hypertext transfer protocol (http), gopher, file transfer protocol (ftp), telnet, and wide area information system (wais).

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) acquire information in electronic formats including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source; and

(B) identify, create, and use available file formats including text, image, video (analog and digital), and audio files.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and employ methods to evaluate the design (for content delivery) and functionality (for navigation and interaction) of WWW pages and compare the method with other established methods;

(B) demonstrate skill in testing the accuracy of information; and

(C) investigate and choose electronic security methods for a web server to protect from unauthorized access and negative intentions.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) use technology tools to create a knowledge base with a broad perspective;

(B) select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunication, draw, paint, and utility programs into the creation of WWW documents;

(C) use foundation and enrichment curricular content in the creation of WWW pages;

(D) create WWW pages using specific authoring tools such as text-based editing programs or graphical-based editing programs;

(E) read, use, and develop technical documentation;

(F) create and edit WWW documents using established design principles including consistency, repetition, alignment, proximity, ratio of text to white space, image file size, color use, font size, type, and style;

(G) demonstrate the ability to control access to the WWW site via password controls and global access/deny controls; and

(H) establish a folder/directory hierarchy for storage of a web page and its related or linked files.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in, appropriate use of, and navigation of LANs, WANs, the Internet, and intranet for research and for sharing of resources;

(B) extend teaching and learning in the local environment to the worldwide community through the creation and sharing of WWW documents;

(C) synthesize and generate new information from data gathered from electronic and telecommunications resources;

(D) create and format WWW documents containing bookmarks of on-line resources and share them electronically;

(E) demonstrate the use of WWW pages, collaborative software, and productivity tools to create products;

(F) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor; and

(G) participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(B) seek and respond to advice from peers and professionals in delineating technological tasks;

(C) create technology specifications for tasks and evaluation rubrics; and

(D) resolve information conflicts and validate information through accessing, researching, and comparing data.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) use hypertext linking appropriately when creating WWW pages;

(B) develop interactivity for the web server via scripting additions such as Common Gateway Interface (CGI), Java Script, or JAVA; and

(C) demonstrate the ability to conduct secure transactions from the web server to the client.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) synthesize and publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and

(B) identify and use LANs, WANs, and remote resources to exchange and publish information.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) create technology specifications for tasks and evaluation rubrics; and

(B) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in evaluating the product.

 

Source: The provisions of this §126.28 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.

§126.29. Independent Study in Technology Applications (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is completion of a high school technology applications course as identified in this subchapter and permission of the instructor/mentor for Independent Study in Technology Applications. This course may be taken at Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.

(2) Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components;

(B) make decisions regarding the selection, acquisition, and use of software taking under consideration its quality, appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency;

(C) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; and

(D) use appropriate technology terminology in the independent study course.

(2) Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of electronic input devices including the mouse, keyboard, scanner, voice/sound recorder, disk/disc, video, and digital camera as appropriate; and

(B) use digital keyboarding standards for data input such as one space after punctuation, the use of em/en dashes, and smart quotation marks.

(3) Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods;

(B) demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and intranet; and

(C) model respect of intellectual property when manipulating, morphing, or editing graphics, video, text, and sound.

(4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including the Internet and intranet, in research and resource sharing;

(B) apply appropriate search strategies in the acquisition of information from the Internet including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and

(C) pose hypotheses/questions related to a selected problem.

(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) acquire information using appropriate research strategies and a variety of electronic formats, including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source; and

(B) identify, create, and use available file formats including text, image, video (analog and digital), and audio files.

(6) Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and employ a method to evaluate the design, functionality, and accuracy of the accessed information; and

(B) analyze information for validity and relevance in the confirmation, testing, and solution of the hypotheses and questions.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) develop and apply advanced technology applications skills;

(B) identify and solve problems, individually and with input from peers and professionals, utilizing research methods and advanced technology applications skills used in a selected profession or discipline;

(C) select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunication, draw, paint, and utility programs into the creation of products;

(D) use foundation and enrichment curricular content in the creation of products;

(E) synthesize and generate new information from data gathered from electronic and telecommunications resources; and

(F) read and use technical documentation.

(8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:

(A) work with a mentor to determine problem to be solved, hypotheses, and strategies to accomplish task;

(B) develop products that meet standards identified by the selected profession or discipline;

(C) produce original work to solve the identified problem and publish the product in electronic media and print;

(D) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/mentor; and

(E) participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.

(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(B) produce documentation to illustrate the progress of the project including, but not limited to journals, logs, videos, pictorial documentation, multimedia products, and printed books; and

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in delineating technological tasks and problem solving.

(10) Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) format the developed projects according to defined output specifications including target audience and viewing environment; and

(B) present findings to a panel for comment and professional response.

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and implement the best method of presenting or publishing findings;

(B) synthesize and publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and

(C) use LANs, WANs, and remote resources to exchange and publish information.

(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review and evaluate the product using technology tools such as database managers, daily/monthly planners, and project management tools;

(B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience, demonstrating that process and product can be evaluated using established criteria or rubrics;

(C) seek and respond to input from peers and professionals in evaluating the product; and

(D) make necessary revisions and/or proceed to the next stage of study.

 

Source: The provisions of this §126.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203.